Month: March 2018

Ken Hermann and Joel Tjintjelaar using the IQ3 100MP Achromatic, Schneider Kreuznach 45mm LS f/3.5 Blue Ring and XF Camera System to capture architecural and portrait photography

From portrait to architecture – versatility of the 45mm lens explained

Ken Hermann is a portrait photographer. Joel Tjintjelaar specializes in architecture photography. Two very different genres, yet both photographers prefer the same lens: the Schneider Kreuznach 45mm Leaf Shutter Blue Ring lens. This lens is an extremely high-quality wide-angle lens with an impressive flat-field performance. The focal length is perfect for almost any application with edge-to-edge performance and almost distortion-free results. These qualities ensure that the versatility of the 45mm lens is guaranteed. Read on to learn how and why a portrait and an architecture photographer use this lens in their work and what it adds to their photography. Architecture photography with the 45mm Blue Ring lens Joel Tjintjelaar explains how the 45mm lens benefits his photography: “Having the right lens can make all the difference. When it comes to architecture photography, the 45mm focal length is especially useful when you’re aiming to shoot skylines or want to focus on specific elements of architectural objects.” “I even used it for still life photographs. It is a very versatile lens, and the quality is beyond any …

Photographer, Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen is the partner and co-founder of Norm Architects, used the Phase One IQ3 100MP to capture "Close Contact" for Sørensen Leather with Kinfolk

Close Contact with Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen

Spheres are everywhere, a natural form that is omnipresent in the universe, from planets to the human eye, and in concepts like a circle of friends. Close Contact explores the human form and the sphere. It looks at how spherical shapes and the human body co-exist and intertwine on a conceptual level, captured in the physical on large print photographs. The texture of leather against skin Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen is the partner and co-founder of Norm Architects in addition to his work as a photographer. Together with the creative direction of Nathan Williams, co-founder of Kinfolk, they collaborated using spheres by Sørensen Leather to juxtapose the texture of leather against skin and explore the sphere-body concept. Big prints of the photo shoot The decision to use a 101-megapixel medium format camera system to make prints was a conscious decision. The camera needed be able to capture an extraordinary amount of detail not possible in other camera systems, since tactility of the subjects being photographed was at the heart of the project. The exhibition comprised of ten …

The Postal Museum in London using Phase One Cultural Heritage equipement such as Phase One XF Camera Systems combined with the IQ3 80MP Digital Back, the IQ3 100MP Digital Back, and a range of Schneider Kreuznach leaf shutter and Phase One lenses and Capture One to capture their images

Delivering historical letters in the digital age

The National Postal Museum first opened in 1966 at the GPO Headquarters, London. When that building closed in the 1990s, the museum was shut down and its collections placed in storage. In 2004, The Postal Heritage Trust was founded to manage the collections and the Royal Mail Archive with an ambition to find a new museum. That ambition was realised in 2017. And now, the Postal Museum’s purpose is to develop access to the world-class collection of objects and documents and show the depth of communications history. With over 318 years of postal history, postal communication is the world’s first social network. The Postal Museum The museum has the world’s foremost collection of British philatelic material. From the birth of the postage stamp in 1840, including over two linear miles (3.2km) of printed and manuscript documents, over 800 maps, and 10,000 posters. The museum’s collection ranges from motor vehicles and pillar boxes to badges and bicycles. The aim is to develop access to this world-class collection of objects and documents that both chart the history …

Timothy Wolcott photographing Antarctica with the IQ3 100MP Digital Back and the XF Camera Body

Tip of the iceberg: Timothy Wolcott photographing Antarctica

Professional photographer, Timothy Wolcott comes from a long line of photographers. He has continued the family tradition, specializing in landscape photography, for which he was twice awarded “World’s Best Landscape Photograph” by the Smithsonian. He shoots with Phase One, and we asked him about his inspiration for his Antarctica shoot and his techniques. Where do you find your inspiration? “I find my inspiration from looking at photography like I was a painter. I look at paintings, Japanese folding screens and drawing out my future photographs I hope to see in the wild. I try to capture the landscape in its most intimate form. I like to make them look like a fantasy by envisioning what light is needed to make the most amazing images. Then waiting and picking exactly the right height, angle space around the subject. I’m usually inspired by bits and pieces of things I’ve seen and I draw hoping to see them in the future.” How do you pick your locations for your photography? “Most of the time finding the right location is about finding …