Author: Leif Steiner

Opening windows into other worlds – Leif Steiner

I don’t have a lot of background in photography, but because of my role as a creative director I believe I developed an eye, a sense of problem-solving, opinions on style – all of which I think can easily be applied to photography. So I approach photography from a problem-solving standpoint. When I look at a photo, I’m very analytical. To me, an extraordinary photo is one that you can look at, but that you can also hear, smell, and taste. The best thing about being a portrait photographer is the ability to interact with people and learn things about them that you would never be able to do otherwise. I’ve learned so much about people by taking their portrait. Traveling to remote places, photographing some of these traditional cultures – there are huge language barriers. Sometimes I have to work with two translators, but I still get to understand a little bit more about their life, and they understand a little bit more about mine. This shared perspective is the richest experience for me. …

Leif Steiner’s creative transformation – from consumer advertising to soulful art

Leif Steiner may be a relative newcomer in photography, but he is a seasoned professional in the creative world. Having left his 20-year career in advertising to pursue photography with the mindset of a cultural anthropologist and the heart of an avid traveler, Leif invested in a Phase One Camera System to accompany him to some of the most remote tribes in the world in an attempt to preserve the culture and the people for future generations. Intrigued by his change from corporate consumerism to soulful art, we caught up with Leif to hear his story. What skills from your career in advertising have you brought with you into photography? I worked as a creative director in the advertising industry for 20 years. It was my job to help our clients sell as many widgets to as many consumers as possible. It’s problem-solving. Photography is also problem-solving. More photos are captured every 24 hours than were captured in the entire 20th century. Out of the billions of images created every single day, what makes certain …