Author: Steven Friedman

Extraordinary stories: Every photo is a journey

Steven Friedman is a fine art landscape photographer from Salt Spring Island, B.C., Canada. He almost literally stumbled upon photography three decades ago, when he discovered a lost camera on a hike. Since then, he’s been refining his style of intimate fine art landscape photography, characterized by careful compositions of nature at its purest. With each image, Steven carries the viewer through time and space to the moment when he took the shot, after days of hiking and hours of hunting for the spot where all of nature comes together in harmony.   Before becoming a full-time photographer, I worked as an economist. Interestingly, some unexpected similarities between the two professions. In economic forecasting, I analyze large volumes of data to find a story in their connections. To me that’s the same as when I’m in a forest and have to interpret all the chaos in front of me, trying to come up with a composition worthy of a fine art print to be sold in a gallery. I had never taken a picture in …

Steven Friedman's intriguing landscapes with the XF IQ3 100MP

Steven Friedman shoots intriguing landscapes

What drives a photographer to branch out into landscape photography? We talk to Steven Friedman about how he made the leap into this genre and what inspires him. What is it about landscape photography that intrigues you? “Remote and inaccessible regions are my interest. I want to photograph unique intimate landscape and go to locations that are seldom visited exploring the wilderness. The best thing about landscape photography is the ability to be outside and experience the beauty of nature. Incredible light and colour in the remote landscape can be extraordinary and I never get tired of experiencing it. Just recently, I was standing in an aspen field and the sun rose in the back of the forest – it was quite a thrill to experience the magical colour and light and to photograph it.” What led you to become a landscape photographer? “I was hiking in late autumn in the Gatineau National Park in Canada and found a 35mm film camera at a viewpoint. Knowing someone must be missing it; I called the ranger …